personal injury results

Severe Brain Injuries as Medical Malpractice Case

Brain injuries are just among the terrible results of major accidents like motorcycle or automobile collisions, sports injuries, or workplace or industrial mishaps.

If someone you know is suffering from an injury, the article entitled Brain Injury Symptoms and Diagnosis by Find Law provides us with a general idea of what a brain injury is.

“Brain Injury Symptoms

Brain injury symptoms indicating that you may have a brain injury include the following:

  • Numbness
  • Excessive drowsiness
  • Severe headache
  • Weakness in your arms or legs
  • Dizziness or loss of vision
  • Slurred speech
  • Loss of consciousness or confusion
  • Vomiting or nausea

If you are experiencing any brain injury symptoms, you should seek immediate medical treatment. Also, brain injury symptoms may not appear immediately, so if you think you may have suffered a brain injury, seek medical assistance.”

Now that you’re aware of the signs and symptoms of a brain injury, Brain Injury Case: The Economics of the Case by TBI Law details the case’s matters.

“Economic Damages in a Brain Injury Case:

Loss of Earning Capacity in a Brain Injury Case.

The first focus on the economic damages is the vocational expert witness. The vocational expert this is the witness who will tell the jury whether the deficits that have been diagnosed will impact the clients future “earning capacity.” If the TBI survivor has problems with fatigue, memory, background noise, concentration, balance, behavior, anger management, frustration, disinhibition, there will likely be a loss of earning capacity. Any of those deficits can negatively impact the ability to maintain competitive employment.

The loss of future earning capacity will be some percentage of the current earnings, if the person is not completely disabled.  Further, even with those who go back to work, there may be a premature retirement, adding full years losses to the end of the earning capacity. This is because disabled people unequivocally leave the work force much earlier.

Now as we compare this to the nominal lost wages in the first hypothetical, we would probably have a total loss of earning capacity of something like $20,000 per year for 12 years, and $40,000 for 12 years.

(This assumes the persons works at a diminished productivity until they are in their late 40’s and is totally disabled thereafter.) Now the lifetime loss of earning capacity could be as much as $720,000.”

Brain Injury Lawsuits by Nolo talk about what you have to do when someone you know suffers a brain injury. Here’s an excerpt:

“Gather Evidence about the Accident and Your Injuries

In preparing your case, an experienced attorney will ask you questions about how your head or brain injury occurred. He or she is likely to ask you what you remember of the accident, how it happened, where you were and what you were doing at the time, and the medical treatment you received. It’s common for brain injury sufferers to experience memory loss when it comes to the events surrounding the injury, so don’t worry if you can’t recall details of the accident. The important thing is to be completely honest with your lawyer and gather as much information as you can from other sources like witnesses, accident reports, and newspaper articles.”

To learn more about what family members can do right after an accident, read the articles in Mcallenpersonalinjurylawyer.com